Forsythe Pot Propagation: Tips On How To Make And Use Forsythe Pots


By: Jackie Rhoades

“If I were you, I’d put those cuttings in a forsythe pot. Propagation is so much easier that way.”

Wait! Back up! What is a forsythe pot? I’d never heard of one, never mind how to use a forsythe pot. I needn’t have worried. Forsythe pot basics are pretty straightforward and learning how to make a forsythe pot is easy. The results are rewarding and it makes a great project for kids.

What is a Forsythe Pot?

So, what is a forsythe pot? For me, an abysmal failure at rooting anything, these pots are a miracle.

My mother always had a jelly jar sitting on the window sill over the kitchen sink and there was always something growing in the water in that jar. She was one of those green-thumb people who could get anything to grow roots. I, on the other hand, have only watched cuttings turn to mush in my jelly jar. I’m not very reliable with cuttings grown in planting mediums either. I forget to water the cuttings I put in the pot and then try to compensate by giving them too much. Learning how to make a forsythe pot was an answer to my prayers.

The two most popular ways to propagate plants is to sow seeds or to take cuttings to root. Sowing seeds is great, but some plants are difficult to grow from seed and when gathered from hybrids don’t always breed true. If you have a plant you want to propagate from cuttings, learning how to use forsythe pots is for you.

Forsythe Pot Basics

One of the nice things about forsythe pot basics is the cost. If you’re already a gardener, you probably won’t have to buy anything, just recycle what you have, and if you’re new to gardening, your cost will be minimal. Here are the materials you will need:

  • A plastic pot with drain holes and at least a 6 to 7 inch (15-18 cm.) diameter. It doesn’t have to be a flower pot as long as it’s about this size or a little larger and there’s a hole in the bottom.
  • A 2 ½ inch (6 cm.) clay pot- sorry, it has to be clay. You’ll see why in a minute.
  • Vermiculite (or other soilless mix), a growing medium soil in most garden departments.
  • Paper towel or a scrap of used paper.
  • A small cork or a plug of children’s play clay (not homemade– too much salt!)
  • Water

That’s it. You can see how easy it is to make substitutions. Now that you’ve gathered your materials, call the kids and let’s learn how to make a forsythe pot together.

How to Make a Forsythe Pot

Here are the steps for putting your forsythe pot together:

  • Cover the hole in the bottom of your plastic container with the paper.
  • Plug the hole in the bottom of the clay pot with cork or clay. This is the most important step in forsythe pot basics. No water should drain from the hole at the bottom of this pot!
  • Fill the plastic pot almost to the top with vermiculite.
  • Push the empty clay pot into the center of the vermiculite filled plastic pot.
  • Fill the clay pot with water and water the vermiculite until water drains freely from the bottom.

You’ve just completed your first forsythe pot! Propagation can begin when the excess drainage from the vermiculite stops. Just place your cutting stems into the vermiculite in a circle around the clay pot.

Forsythe Pot Propagation – How to Use Forsythe Pots

The principle behind how to use forsythe pots lies in the vermiculite and clay pot. Vermiculite holds water. Clay doesn’t. Keep the clay pot filled with water and it will gradually seep through the clay into the vermiculite, but it will only let out enough water to keep the vermiculite damp.

That’s the miracle of the forsythe pot. Propagation is easy because the cuttings will remain in a moist, but never soggy, environment and you never have to decide when or how much to water. Just keep the clay pot full of water and let the pot do all the work!

So, what is a forsythe pot? It’s a simple propagation tool. For me, learning how to use a forsythe pot makes me almost as good as my mother was at rooting plant cuttings. That makes me proud.

This article was last updated on

Read more about Gardening Projects


Forsythe Pots for Rooting

First, I'd like to apologize for my poor-quality photos in advance- my regular camera is not working at the moment, so I'm stuck with the camera on my phone.

I'm not sure how many of you(if any) know of a rooting technique using what I know as a 'Forsythe Pot', so I thought I'd share. I've tried several different Hoya, and so far, my success has been 100%! Here is a pic of what I'm talking about:

Basically, to make it, you have to have a large pot- I chose a 10 inch, I think(and the material doesn't really matter for this one), and a smaller pot- a 4 inch CLAY pot. You have to plug the hole in the smaller pot. You could use cork or something of that nature, but I used a type of Quick Steel because that was what I had on hand. You fill the large pot with vermiculite, then screw or press the smaller pot in the center. Fill the smaller pot with water, and also wet the vermiculite(this is the only time you will have to do that). The smaller clay pot allows water to seep out into the vermiculite, keeping it damp and allowing plants to root easily.


Olla experiment

I read a thread on here where someone was talking about ollas. I was so intrigued I decided I just had to try it. I made a couple of homemade ollas out of terra cotta pots siliconed together. I kind of combined the olla and earthbox ideas into one and came up with what you see in the picture. I wanted to really test it so I used high water demand plants, four compact vine cucumbers. I also planted one with two pepper plants. If anybody has used ollas before please tell me about your experiences with them and how they worked.

Here is the one with the two peppers. Murphy obviously thinks I'm crazy, but I have a really good feeling about this experiment. I think it will work better than I expect it to.

These olla's are old terracotta wine bottle holders I found at Goodwill.

Looks neat - can I ask what is Ollas?
thanks
bre

Google "olla" for an explanation. These are actually faux olla's. Real ones have a round body for holding the water and a long thin neck to discourage evaporation. I use them to help me water in this blazing hot desert. The water weeps from the olla into the soil. I think they are a success. They need to be covered with a terracotta saucer. I used a plate to start out with and the water got way hot. With the terracotta saucer the water does not heat up much at all even at 114 degrees in the afternoon.

An olla is nothing more than an unglazed terra cotta vessel which is buried close to the plant you intend to water. Fill the olla with water and it slowly seeps out watering the plant. From what I have read it is very direct watering, giving the plant, and really only the plant the water it needs. The intended plant will wrap its roots around the olla basically hogging all the water forcing out the weeds. I read they have been used for hundreds of years by the Spanish and Native Americans. So simple and elegant, I'm fascinated.

rlt850nomore--it may have been your thread that I read that mentioned the olla. Have you used them for long and if so how successfully? Ollas are expensive to buy, I will have to start nosing around Goodwill:)

rtl850nomore--After I made my first olla I filled it and set it in the sink. It seemed to weep out and empty fairly quickly. After burying them though they seem to weep out much slower. After a full day the water level has not gone down much at all. Do you find the same is true for yours?

This message was edited Jun 22, 2008 9:28 PM

TMaple, this is the first year for me and my olla's. I was looking for a way to water some pots that were not close to a watering source. And, being in the Southwest, naturally gravitated toward olla's. I too found them pricy and began to research how I could simulate one. I finally found a deep terracotta pot with no hole in the bottom but it was larger at the top than at the bottom and took up too much space in the planter. Then it dawned on me that those terracotta wine bottle holders of old would be perfect. Since I found my first two I have never seen them again. I have several people on the hunt for me as I want to experiment with in the ground olla's for the winter growing season here.

As far as water usage . yesterday I filled both of them to the brim and this morning they are only half way full. As I mentioned, it was 114 degrees yesterday which may have something to do with the water usage. Also, when it was cooler, the olla did not go down as much. When I first started with the olla's I found I had to wet the soil in the planters to get the olla to start weeping. kind of like priming the pump. The other thing is to soak the olla in a bucket of water prior to placing it in the soil.

Hope your olla's are a great success for you TMaple

I did water the cucmbers and the peppers conventionally after I planted them with the olla, just to get them going. I didn't think of presoaking the olla, that sounds like a key idea. They are easy enough to make and fairly cheap using two pots, I just wonder how well the silicone will hold up. The plastic mulch on my buckets goes a long way to keep the water from evaporating also, so I guess you can't really compare it to one planted in the ground without mulch.

We are just starting to get into the 80's here in MN so we don't have to deal with the heat like you do. As a matter of fact, the closest I have ever seen to 114 degrees was in Mexico. It was 112 one day when I was there on a vacation. Can't imagine living in heat like that, but then people can't imagine living in the cold of a MN winter.

I've been batting this idea around for a while. I saw an article on the internet where these are used in the African desert with great success. I have a number of places where they should work well. If the plant is a small shrub, how big do you think the olla needs to be?

I did see where someone said that starting cuttings in what she called a forsythe pot worked really well. This is very similar to the ollas. It involves using a plastic pot (with the holes plugged up), filling it with vermiculite, then sinking a smaller terracotta pot (again with the holes plugged up) into the vermiculite. You dampen the vermiculite, soak the small pot, and then sink it into the larger one up to its rim, fill it with water. The water in the small pot weeps out to keep the vermiculite dampened. I've not tried this yet, but I'm going to. The person who gave these instructions swears that it works better than anything else. I can't buy vermiculite here, so I'll have to try using perlite. Problem is that perlite doesn't really work the same way as vermiculite.

These are the sites I found the most interesting and informative when I was researching ollas. The SLI site has photos of people using ollas from around the world. I will definitely look up forsythe pots:)


This is a watering system based on the idea of an olla. I'm working on repicating it with household items for next year.
http://www.wateringsystems.net/index.html


Everything I have read about ollas says to be wary of using them with plants that have strong woody root systems (shrubs and trees) because they eventually break the olla.


This message was edited Jun 23, 2008 9:55 AM

Well, nuts, I guess I won't put them by my crepe myrtle trees then.

I like the system in the last link. What are you thinking of using to replicate it? Considering the pure red clay on this property, I probably should figure out a way to mold my own pots. Put this garbage "soil" to work. LOL.

The articles I found on forsythe pots talk about using cuttings from house plants, but it's my understanding that they work well for cuttings from all different kinds of plants.

glendalekid--I am making my own ollas out of terra cota pots siliconed together, some cork or rubber stoppers with a hole, some flexible tubing and T-fittings, and a five gallon bucket. I hope it will all work. When I get it done I will post a picture of what I come up with. I like the decorative holding pots they show on the site for the indoor plants or where appearance is important.

I did look up forsythe pots. My local university extension has a very good pdf on making and using one. The first thought that came to mind was using it to root the suckers I pinch off my tomatoes so I can have even more tomatoes. I will build one to see how it works for that. You'll have to let me know how the forsythe pot woks for you.

Yes, post photos of the olla-like watering system when you get it together. I would be most interested in seeing it.

I would think that rooting tomato suckers in a forsythe pot should work fine. I'm going to try to put mine together tomorrow. I was able to buy vermiculite at the Farmer's Co-op yesterday. Last year they didn't even know what I was asking for when I inquired -- gardening supplies are looking up here in AL. I'll let you know how it works for me. I want to try some verbena cuttings.

glendalekid--Here is my forsythe pot I put together last night. All of the plants being rooted are suckers I clipped off my tomatoes. We'll see how it works. I'm still working on the olla "system" but I'll post a photo when I get something together that I think will work.

The olla experiment is "so far so good". All of the water these plants are getting is coming from the ollas and the plants are all doing very well.

This is the one with the peppers.

I rooted two suckers last year from my tomatoes. It worked really well and they rooted easily. I did it too late in the summer and couldn't keep them going after the weather got too cold. You should be fine, though, starting them this early. I've read that suckers won't produce fruit, but I had a hard time finding suckers that didn't have flowers on them. Sooo. . . what do I know. I didn't get my forsythe pot together yet. Forgot I need a saucer for a cover. Sheesh!!

Your ollas are looking great. It strikes me that using ollas to water container plants is very much like the EBs, except cheaper and easier to put together. Love your ScoopAway pots -- I have them, too! I've been collecting them under my back deck. Now, you've given me a great idea what to do with them. How big of a terracotta pot did you use?

Thanks SOOOO much for the information in this thread. I had never heard of ollas, and I have a feeling that next year I'm going to be burying them in my raised beds.

glendalekid--I don't know why they wouldn't produce fruit, the suckers of the plants are what makes a vine that produces fruit. We'll see. I used 4" pots for the cucumbers in the ScoopAway tub and 5" pots for the 5 gallon pail that has the peppers in it. The ScoopAway buckets are great for many things, I just wish I could get the label off. They are actually printed on and not a sticker. I knew my wife's cats would be good for something! jk I put a cover on the little terra cotta pot in my forsythe pot just to keep the vermiculite and other things out of it. It is working very well.

Ok TMaple, it seems that the stash of terracotta wine bottle holders has dissappeared from the greater Phoenix area so I am going to have to make some ollas like you did. Will you please tell me which silicone you used to put them together? I have collected some sunflower seed buckets that I am going to use and like your ScoopAway buckets the label is printed on the bucket. I am going to get some paint for plastic at my HD and spray that label away. I need everything to be really white so that it reflects the sun in this blast furnace desert. I am pretty pumped that you, glendalekid, and mgpaquin are jumping on the olla bandwagon.

Hmmm. Anyone from zone 8 that's tried this?? I'm in southeast Arky. hot/humid/dry.

My ollas are working like a charm! I will use them much more extensively next year. When I put my ollas together I just used some silicone calk I had laying around the house. It was some stuff I used for my windows and it was very old. If I were buying some new I would use something marine grade, like what they use in fish tanks. I am curious to see how the stuff I used holds up after a season of being wet and under dirt. I bought some plain cork plugs to plug the hole in the bottom pot.

SherryLike--I am not in zone 8 but I see now reason why the ollas wouldn't work anywhere. Check out the link above for the SLI site and you can see some of the places around the world where they are used.

I did spray some of my ScoopAway buckets with the plastic paint, but not others. Depends on how ambitious I feel at the time, I guess. LOL. I had thought that the lid could be used as the bottom of a homemade EB, but your olla idea is way easier.

I don't know why folks say suckers won't produce fruit. They do on my tomato plants. I just keep reading where the advice is to remove the suckers because they "drain" the energy of the plant by being non-productive. I haven't found this to be true.

glendalekid--I bet the lids could easily be made into false bottoms for EBs but I find it easier to just stack one bucket inside the other. I also thought the ScoopAway buckets would work well for a "topsy turvy" type of tomato planter but I have enogh experiments going already. Maybe next year:) I still really like my homemade EBs. They are more work to put together but they sure work well.

I let the first couple of suckers above the first blossom cluster form into new vines. All the rest of the suckers on the main vine and the suckers that will form on the new vines I remove, otherwise you get a lot of small fruit instead of a reasonable amount of decent sized fruit.

Well, I'm waiting to see how your ScoopAway olla pot EBs work out -- I think they look like the easiest way yet for an home-made EB. I think you are right that they would work well for a topsy-turvy tomato planter.

Last year I did take the suckers off like you are describing. I can't say that the size or the number of tomatoes was improved by this. But it might have been the varieties I was growing, too. I had Sunmaster, Better Boy, and Arkansas Traveler. Personally, I didn't like any of them, for taste or productivity.

This year I was late getting my seeds started so I bought six plants of Celebrity. I didn't take any of the suckers off and got tons of good-sized tomatoes and they tasted wonderful. Since Celebrity is determinate, they are nearly through.

However, I now have Mortgage Lifter, Rutgers, and Mystery Tomato (seeds from last year's unknown volunteer) about 18" high and starting to bloom. The unknown volunteer was by far the best tomato I had last year, productive and wonderful flavor. I'm hoping it will be as good this year.

OK, I've gotta ask: do you make holes in the bottom of your litter buckets for your olla containers? I ask because I have 3 cats, and therefore a plethora of litter buckets. No ollas, mind you, but when did something like that stop me? =)

Got you beat! I've got five.

That's a good question. For using the clay pots and litter buckets to make forsythe pots to start cuttings, you wouldn't put holes in the litter buckets since you want to keep it damp and it only gets water from the seepage of the clay pot inside. I didn't think to ask about holes in them for the olla pots.

I put holes in the bottom of my buckets even with the olla because I put a simple cork in the bottom to plug the hole. If the cork fails or the silicone holding the two pots together fails the water would drain out and not flood the bucket. Its just a precaution. Also, if you don't use plastic mulch over the bucket a good rain will flood it.

Its not necessary to trim the suckers off a determinate tomato because the plant gets to a certain size and stops. Indeterminate tomatoes will vine and grow as far as they are allowed to. I use trimming the suckers as a way to keep the plants under control. I have 2 early girls, 2 roma, a sungold, a yellow pear, a healthkick, a peron, a better boy, a gran marzano nano, and a paragon all planted in EBs or EPs. I also have a grape tomato and two tomatillos (I know they are not really tomatoes, but. ) planted in the ground. They are all doing great, healthy and loaded with blossoms and little tomatoes. They do way better in the EBs and EPs than they do in the ground, in my garden anyway, because of the consistent water supply they have. Part of the reason I am interested in the ollas is so I can plant some in the ground and maybe get results like the EBs and EPs get.

My wife has two "inside" cats and they poop plenty. Thats why I have so many ScoopAway buckets:)

I misunderstood the part earlier where you used silicone to put two pots together. Duh! Somebody want to tell me to pay attention and learn to read? LOL. OK, NOW I understand what you did. Yes, you would definitely want to have holes in the bottom as a precaution. I'm thinking that maybe this would be a good idea for the tomato plants and pepper plants in my raised beds.

Comes the dumb question. If you have the two pots siliconed together with just a little hole in the top of the upper one, how do you tell whether you need to add water to them?

You've got a terrific selection of tomatoes there. I'm the only one who eats the tomatoes, so I don't plant that many. Even so, I give lots of them away. My daughter and granddaughter may not appreciate them, but others do.

ps: All my cats are inside cats. Have been since the day someone deliberately ran over and killed my favorite buddy years ago.

I just put a stick down the hole in the top of the olla. Put it all the way to the bottom, grab the stick at the top of the olla, and when you pull it out it should show how much water is is the olla as far as full, half full, down 3 inches from the top, etc. This is how I check the water level in my EBs and EPs.

I thought that must be it -- but I wanted to be sure. LOL. I think this is so ingenious -- please keep us informed as to how it's going.

I found this post while browsing around looking for sites to purchase olla's. I found wine chillers and olla's for reasonable prices at the link below.

So.. what were the results of your olla experiment?

Sorry about the delayed response. I find I don't have the time to hang out on the forums like I did in the past. The experiment was very successful, so successful in fact that I have almost abandoned my self watering containers. I still have a few self watering pails going but now I use ollas for almost everything, especially water greedy and sensitive plants like tomatoes and cucumbers.


Try this link, the one above didn't work for me.

With all this red clay around me, I should be able to make my own olla's from scratch!


Cuttings started in 'Forsythe pot' will root better

Saturday

Taking cuttings of your favorite plants while they're still actively growing is a great and inexpensive way to perpetuate tender annuals, old friends and new acquisitions as insurance for next year, or simply to expand the garden or share your plants with others.

Taking cuttings of your favorite plants while they're still actively growing is a great and inexpensive way to perpetuate tender annuals, old friends and new acquisitions as insurance for next year, or simply to expand the garden or share your plants with others.

There are many methods to get plant cuttings to root, including suspending them in water. One of my most successful ways has been the "Forsythe pot." Cuttings started with this system develop strong, robust roots that are less likely to rot before they're ready to transplant. They also take the move to potting soil better than "water" roots, which tend to form brittle clumps when removed from the water.

Start with a clean, 8-inch-diameter plastic pot. The nonporous plastic will help retain moisture. Sterilize with a solution of one part chlorine bleach to nine parts water, rinse and let dry. Cover the drainage holes with a piece of paper towel or large coffee filter and fill the pot to the rim with vermiculite, a fluffy, fast-draining but moisture-retaining mineral that lets new roots develop quickly while giving them lots of support.

Next, seal the drainage hole of a 4-inch terra-cotta clay pot to make a watertight reservoir. You can use a small cork or a bit of plastic from a milk carton or coffee-can lid covered with silicon tub calking. Press and rotate the clay pot into the center of the vermiculite until its rim is level with the surface.

Gently water the vermiculite until the water runs out of the drainage holes of the plastic pot. Once it's saturated, this should be the only time you need to water the vermiculite directly.

Fill the terra-cotta pot reservoir with water, and keep the level topped off. The permeable terra-cotta clay will let water slowly seep into the vermiculite, keeping the cuttings moist without pouring water over them and possibly disturbing their growing roots.

Select the plants you want to propagate and take fairly good-sized cuttings from the ends of younger growth, if possible. Trim up to just below the point a leaf is attached to the stem. Many plants generate new roots from this node. Remove all but the leaves closest to the tip of the cutting. Too many leaves can dry the plant out before it has a chance to develop roots to take up replacement water.

Dip the end of the cutting, including the leaf node, in rooting hormone and gently tap off the excess powder. Then stick the cutting firmly into the moist vermiculite, covering the node deeply.

Place the Forsythe pot in a well-lit location out of direct sun. A north-facing window or under fluorescent lights is ideal. With no roots to take up water, the cuttings could dry out under bright, hot light. Some folks try to counter this by putting a large plastic bag over the pot to hold in moisture. I avoid this because it tends to promote rot. The slow trickle of water through the terra cotta lets the cuttings lose, and replace, all the water they need at their own pace. And it's easy to see when the reservoir needs refilling.

In a week or so, start adding a quarter-strength solution of an all-purpose organic liquid fertilizer to the water when you top off the reservoir. A few weeks later, test root growth by gently tugging on the cuttings. They should feel firmly entrenched in the vermiculite. You can work the medium aside with a finger to see the healthy root growth.

At this point, you can remove the terra-cotta pot and slice the roots between the cuttings to transplant to a larger container filled with sterile potting medium. Water thoroughly with half-strength, balanced liquid fertilizer, one with the same percentage of all elements, such as a 5-5-5.

Now it's just a matter of keeping the plants moist, well lit and warm. Using the Forsythe pot will give your cuttings the best possible start and provide all kinds of new plants for next year's garden.


118 Birch Cir, Forsyth, GA 31029

This new construction, quick move-in home is the "Harrison" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River at 214 Shoshone Cir, Forsyth, GA-31029. This inventory home is priced at $319,900 and has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 half baths, is 2,778 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Wind River features single family homes by Hughston Homes. Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

Keller Williams Realty Atlanta Partners

MONROE COUNTY, in a sought-after RIVER FOREST Subdivision, in Phase III of a 1700 Acre private Subdivision we are featuring Residential Land Lots 12 and 13 (Adjoining) for sale in this gorgeous Equestrian Gated Community. This is LOT 13. The amenities alone in this private community is reason enough to buy and build your dream home. Monroe County is a great place to live with one of the best school districts in Middle Georgia. Amenities in this community features a Championship 18 Hole Golf Course! Did I mention Lot 13 is on the Featured Golf Course? Additional Amenities: Gated with 24-Hour Security with Staff, Stunning Clubhouse, including a Restaurant, 2 Pools, Fitness Facility, Tennis Courts, Pickle Ball Courts, Soccer Field, a Park and Play Ground, Lakes, Walking Tracks, Equestrian Facility to house your horse, Stables with a Riding Arena on a Fabulous 50 Acres of Trails and Pasture, plenty of trails to ride, Neighborhood Association Sidewalks, Street Lights and Underground Utilities. The beautiful Towaliga River runs through the Subdivision with stunning views with access to Fishing on this incredible river along with other activities. Build you dream home in this hidden treasure! Resort style living right in the heart of Central Georgia. This is a one-of-a-kind development with stunning properties and views that you could never tire of. This is definitely a little piece of paradise! Make it yours today. HOA with Covenants and Building Restrictions Fees are Annually $1,000 or a Payment Plan with 25% down and 3 monthly installments Annually. The Homes in this community are absolutely stunning! Also, we have an additional Residential Land Lot 12 that adjoins and connects to Lot 13 sold separately, buy both Lots and build on them both give you 679 sq. ft of Frontage on the beautiful18 Hold Championship Golf Course. The cost of Lots in this subdivision cost up to $200,000 per lot. The information in this listing is taken from public & other Sources, is deemed relia

This to-be-built home is the "Camden" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River. This plan home is priced from $298,400 and has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 half baths, is 2,599 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Wind River features single family homes by Hughston Homes. Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

This to-be-built home is the "Hawthorn" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River. This plan home is priced from $300,400 and has 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, is 2,635 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Wind River features single family homes by Hughston Homes. Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

This to-be-built home is the "Redbud" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River. This plan home is priced from $333,400 and has 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1 half baths, is 2,970 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Wind River features single family homes by Hughston Homes. Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

This to-be-built home is the "Westover" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River. This plan home is priced from $318,400 and has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 half baths, is 2,886 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Wind River features single family homes by Hughston Homes. Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

WOW is what you will say when you enter this home. Over 5 acres! Tons of upgrades. Custom cabinets with granite, pot filler, and island grace the kitchen. Both showers have been luxuriously remodeled with free standing tub in master. 4 bedrooms/2 baths. Shiplap in many parts of home. LVP throughout. Large laundry/pantry. Outside you will find covered patio with outdoor kitchen. Outdoor furniture stays! Huge shop to house all your toys! Don't wait to see this one.

Capshaw Homes presents the Hawthorne at Greystone on a 1 acre lot. The Hawthorne features a spacious master on the main with sitting room as well as an additional guest bedroom and full bath on the main level. This craftsman-style boasts 5 bedrooms, 4 full baths, and a multi-purpose flex/media room. Brick/stone front and true Hardie Plank Siding. All heated spaces are generously maximized for your enjoyment. Greystone offers tree-lined streets, sidewalks, pool, clubhouse, tennis courts, and high speed fiber internet. Homes are built with top-notch integrity & attention to detail. All Capshaw homes come with a 2-10 Homebuyer's Warranty for peace of mind. Owners enjoy hardwoods on main public areas, granite counter tops throughout, coffered ceilings, recessed lighting, irrigation system, and much more! . Stock photos of a previously built home of the same plan for marketing purposes only.

This to-be-built home is the "Aspen" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River. This single family plan home is priced from $300,400 and has 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1 half baths, is 2,671 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Builder describes this home as: "The living is easy in this extraordinary floor plan by Hughston Homes!. The charming Aspen Home Plan at Wimberly Station, a Hughston community - encompasses four spacious bedrooms with plenty of room for relaxing, entertaining, study and sleep, three and a half luxurious bathrooms, two story entry foyer, spacious Media Room, and a stylish Kitchen offering a huge island that flows through to the Dining Area, Great Room with corner fireplace, and Signature Game Day Porch with fireplace. The OWNER'S SUITE ON MAIN, complete with huge walk-in closet, separate vanities, garden tub and shower, ensures privacy from upstairs. Upstairs you will find the open Media Room with large storage closet, two spacious bedrooms offering full Jack and Jill bath, second full bathroom, and third bedroom featuring a spacious walk-in closet. With its open concept and trendy warm design, this home provides all of the elements needed for a happy, healthy, and peaceful home". Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

This to-be-built home is the "Harrison" plan by Hughston Homes, and is located in the community of The Wind River. This plan home is priced from $318,400 and has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 half baths, is 2,778 square feet, and has a 2-car garage. The Wind River features single family homes by Hughston Homes. Listing provided by newhomesource.com.

Great Monroe County location just minutes from everything. Plenty of room for the entire family in this 1 level with basement. Large galley kitchen with eat in area. Gather by the fireplace under the high vaulted ceilings with exposed beams in the great room or go down to the grand playroom - also with a fireplace! Sunroom and dining room with plenty of natural light overlooking fenced in back yard. Wrap around back porch for relaxing. Large master with his/her closets and en-suite with dual sinks. Great schools and located in a USDA 100% financing Zone. Buy for less than you can rent. Come see today!

Better than new, craftsman style home in sought after River Forest gated subdivision. This gated community offers so many amenities that you'll never be bored. If you prefer some quiet time, you can enjoy sitting on your screened porch with a cozy fire in the outdoor fireplace or grilling out on the large patio. This home features an open floor plan with views from the kitchen into the family room, breakfast room, and formal dining room. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, large island with farmhouse sink, and stainless appliances. Split bedroom plan with spacious master suite and spa style bath featuring a separate shower and soaker tub. Oversized laundry room and walk-in pantry. Storage space galore in the unfinished attic area (could be finished for additional rooms if needed). This home features many upgrades such as a tankless water heater, irrigation system, sodded front and back yard, spray foam insulation for energy savings, 3 car garage with workspace area, and so much more. Call today for your appointment and don't miss your chance to own this beautiful home. Use one of our preferred lenders and receive $500 lender credit.

Keller Williams Realty Atlanta Partners

MONROE COUNTY, in a sought-after RIVER FOREST Subdivision, in Phase III of a 1700 Acre private Subdivision we are featuring Residential Land Lots 12 and 13 (Adjoining) for sale in this gorgeous Equestrian Gated Community. This is LOT 13. The amenities alone in this private community is reason enough to buy and build your dream home. Monroe County is a great place to live with one of the best school districts in Middle Georgia. Amenities in this community features a Championship 18 Hole Golf Course! Did I mention Lot 13 is on the Featured Golf Course? Additional Amenities: Gated with 24-Hour Security with Staff, Stunning Clubhouse, including a Restaurant, 2 Pools, Fitness Facility, Tennis Courts, Pickle Ball Courts, Soccer Field, a Park and Play Ground, Lakes, Walking Tracks, Equestrian Facility to house your horse, Stables with a Riding Arena on a Fabulous 50 Acres of Trails and Pasture, plenty of trails to ride, Neighborhood Association Sidewalks, Street Lights and Underground Utilities. The beautiful Towaliga River runs through the Subdivision with stunning views with access to Fishing on this incredible river along with other activities. Build you dream home in this hidden treasure! Resort style living right in the heart of Central Georgia. This is a one-of-a-kind development with stunning properties and views that you could never tire of. This is definitely a little piece of paradise! Make it yours today. HOA with Covenants and Building Restrictions Fees are Annually $1,000 or a Payment Plan with 25% down and 3 monthly installments Annually. The Homes in this community are absolutely stunning! Also, we have an additional Residential Land Lot 12 that adjoins and connects to Lot 13 sold separately, buy both Lots and build on them both give you 679 sq. ft of Frontage on the beautiful18 Hold Championship Golf Course. The cost of Lots in this subdivision cost up to $200,000 per lot. The information in this listing is taken from public & other Sources, is deemed relia

12.20 Acres - Offers plenty of privacy and is ready to build on. Wooded and open areas. Small stream on back right side of property. Driveway in place. Interior road to house site. Home site has been graded and has county water available at site. Convenient location to 1-75, Macon or Atlanta. Satisfactory perc test on file. Property is currently enrolled in a Conservation Program (CUVA) which reduces the owners property taxes. At closing, Buyer must agree to sign up to assume the remainder of the term of the CUVA contract which expires 12/31/29.

You will need to visit this 5 bedroom 4 1/2 bath estate in Chriswood Subdivision to appreciate its very unique features and beautiful surroundings. This is an extremely well built home that is located at the end of Chriswood Dr in a cul-de-sac on a heavily wooded and private 6.22 acre's. You will feel like you are in the North Georgia Mountains when you walk through the homes front door and experience the stunning views from your wall to wall Anderson Windows. This is a 2 story home with a full basement and one finished room that could be used as a 6th bedroom or office space. The home has a large upper wood deck and a lower concrete deck at the basement level. Forsyth CableNet has just installed a Gigabit 'next generation broadband internet service'.


Propagation

Unlike potato tubers, you can't cut begonia tubers into pieces to produce more plants. Although some growers divide begonia tubers, they must make the divisions when the plant is actively growing, and the tuber pieces often become diseased and rotten. It is easier for homeowners to propagate rooting cuttings or starting from seed.

Propagating by root cuttings

A common way to propagate tuberous begonias is to root cuttings. If you thin out the stems when they are about 3 inches tall, you can use those cuttings. Some gardeners cut a small piece of tuber with each shoot to increase the chances of the stem rooting, but the wound on the tuber may allow disease-causing organisms to attack the tuber.

Before you take the cuttings, prepare what is called a forsythe pot in which to root them. To prepare a forsythe pot:

  1. Take a 2- to 3-inch unglazed clay pot and cork the drainage hole in its bottom.
  2. Fill a 10-inch plastic pot with vermiculite.
  3. Push the clay pot down into the vermiculite of the plastic pot. There should be a 3-inch wide ring of vermiculite around the clay pot.
  4. Moisten the vermiculite, then fill the clay pot with water.
  5. Cut the stems to be rooted and insert them into the moist vermiculite.
  6. Put the whole assembly into a clear plastic bag.
  7. Fasten the top of the bag to keep the air around the cuttings humid.
  8. Set the Forsythe pot in a warm place with bright indirect light.
  9. The clay pot is a water reservoir, so you will not need to water the cuttings as long as you keep it filled.

After two to four weeks, cuttings should be well-rooted. Open the plastic bag a little more each day for a few days to accustom the plants to normal humidity. Then plant them in pots, harden them off, and transplant them outside as described earlier. By September, small tubers will have formed, which you should cure and store just as you would larger tubers.

Propagating by seed

Tuberous begonias can also be propagated from seed, but the seeds must be started in December or January for summer bloom! Fill containers with fine-textured potting mix and moisten it. Press seeds onto the surface of the medium and cover them lightly with milled sphagnum. Moisten the sphagnum with a sprayer, then cover with glass or plastic wrap to keep moisture in.

At a constant temperature of 70, germination usually takes about ten days, but it can take as long as three weeks, especially if the temperature of the potting soil is lower than 70. Leave the plastic or glass on for one or two days after germination, then remove it.

Thin the seedlings to 2 inches apart. Bright light such as from a fluorescent grow light is helpful in producing sturdy seedlings.

When they become crowded, transplant them to larger pots, using a porous, well-drained potting mix. Harden the plants off, then plant them in hanging baskets, in larger containers, or directly in your garden.


Watch the video: Adding Transplants to Food Gardens


Previous Article

Sedum rupestre 'Angelina'

Next Article

Winter Care For Caladiums – Learn About Caladium Care In Winter