Kalanchoe x houghtonii


Succulentopedia

Kalanchoe x houghtonii (Mother of Millions Hybrid)

Kalanchoe x houghtonii (Mother of Millions Hybrid) is a monocarpic succulent with an erect, unbranched stem that grows up to 30 inches…


SOLVED: Kalanchoe serrata or Kalanchoe x houghtonii .

I have this Kalanchoe brought from the mountain. I thought it was a Kalanchoe serrata. learned so. So appearing on some web pages, also in PlantFiles. But then I had doubts because there is another very similar : Kalanchoe x houghtonii ( K. daigremontiana y K. delagoensis ). I also found a reliable site, there appears a K. serrata completely different . http://www.sven-bernhard.de/anzeige_bilder_en.htm

I consulted an expert ..a friend from Spain . He has confirmed to me that my Kalanchoe is the hybrid Kalanchoe x houghtonii ( K. daigremontiana y K. delagoensis ) that the K. serrata do not look anything like my plant. Also confirmed that K. serrata is than appears in the link up ( http://www.sven-bernhard.de/bilder/75_HD_101527_07.JPG)

This is my Kalanchoe. what say the experts here ?? help me to remove my doubts please. Is there now another plant misidentified on the web ?

This message was edited Jan 27, 2011 1:23 AM


Cactus and Succulents forum→Kalanchoe chat and photos

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DaisyI said: I never keep up with the name changes for two reasons: First, I don't feel like wasting all that plastic writing new tags. And second, I don't want my cactus, most of whom are old, to have an identify crisis in their old age.

And I especially don't rename Kalanchoes.

What happens with an identity crisis?

Its best not to put your cactus through this emotional turmoil in the first place. And always maintain a good relationship with open communication because it may save their lives.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. "WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org


The most common one that I hear is Kall (rhymes with tall) an koe wee.

But I have heard Northern Irish people reduce it to "clan kwee" and I like that. It's so much simpler.






I'm 34 but have a cluttered mind, a cluttered plant room, and occasional difficulty pronouncing Latin. Tags help with all three!



The leaves of other species will make leaf-edge babies, but from what I've seen of them, the leaves generally do not do that unless/until it is removed from the plant.
Cathedral Bells (Kalanchoe pinnata)
Marnier's Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe marnieriana)
Lavender Scallops (Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi)

And "donkey ears" usually makes just 1 or 2 babies @ the end of each leaf.
Donkey Ears (Kalanchoe gastonis-bonnieri)



To induce flowering properly in the spring they seem to respond to a period of low temperatures over the winter, maybe a low as 5°c. That is what works for me.


Regarding name tags, I'm not a big fan. For serious growers they tend to be pretty important, and I can see how they would help keep track of vast amounts of plants. But my situation is not so complicated. I have a spot in the garage where I have put every name tag that ever came my way. They never make it out onto the patio. At this point I only keep them in case I need to extract information in the future.

When I need to label seedlings in order to know who's who down the road, I will use a sharpie on the side of the pot, where I'll never see the ink unless I'm looking for it. When I pass plants on, I will tape a nametag label onto the side with care info. But otherwise, I find tags an aesthetic loss, cluttering up a scene I like to look a certain way. I don't need to know exactly when I sowed X, Y or Z. And actually I find the lack of tags a good incentive to remember who's who in my own head, or at the least know where to look if I really need to tell two plants apart. Each watering session gives me an automatic review so nobody is forgotten.

And when the cacti change names all over again I'll just be blissfully ignorant, which is mostly how I prefer it with that family.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. "WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org

Going back to Kalanchoe x houghtonii. After flowering it will divide at the flowering point and start to grow three or more strong shoots. Cut these off, dry for a couple of days and pot up for a head start on new plants. Cut off what is left of the old stem just above the second leaf node and strong new stems will start there as well.

If you're being greedy cut the old main stem into two leaf chunks, remove the leaves down one side, dry for a couple of days and then press them down into some compost - even more new fast growing plants!


Tips to take care of the Kalanchoe x houghtonii

This plant can be outside, in a space exposed to direct sun or semi-shade, protected from drafts and wind.

Or we can place it inside, but in a place where it receives enough sunlight.

To grow this plant you can use a universal substrate lowered with some sand, so that it is loose, and add at the base of the substrate etch, to make the substrate have a good drainage, and so avoid root rot problems.

The kalanchoe x houghtonii is very resistant to drought.

This plant can pass without any problem, periods without being watered.

You should only water the plant when you see that the substrate is completely dry.

In winter and during the cold season we will reduce the risks, especially if the temperatures reach below 10 degrees C.

As mentioned earlier, the flowering of this type of plant is very unusual, but in the case of flowering, it occurs in late winter or early spring, from the second year of growth.

Its flowers are given in groups in colorful tufts of pink bells.

When flowering ends, the floral wand must be cut.

Pruning and maintenance

It is a plant that can last between three and seven years, which does not need to be pruned, the only pruning that is done is when cutting the floral wand when it begins to wilt.

We will transplant normally every two years, we will observe that the plant will present the somewhat curved leaves facing down, and the roots will be tight, and almost without free substrate.

Pests and diseases

It is a species that is not usually affected by pests, in terms of diseases, the most frequent are those caused by fungi, which cause root rot and the appearance of white spots on the leaves, or the blackening of the points, so we will avoid wetting the leaves whenever we water the plant, and avoid waterlogging in the substrate, using good drainage, and watering only when the substrate is completely dry.

Propagation

This hybrid reproduces by seed and also vegetatively through the small seedlings that occur along the edges of its fleshy leaves and also on the branches of its old flower clusters.

You can also use the leaves that come off give rise to new plants.

If you are going to propagate the plant by seeds, you should only disperse the small seeds through the garden, or in a pot, with a specific succulent substrate.

Since the plant is of a good size you can transplant the plant to the place or pot where you want the plant to grow.

Water the seeds with an atomizer (you can do it daily), taking care that no puddles of water form in the substrate, and as the plant grows you must reduce the days of irrigation and wait until the substrate is dry before water it again.

If you propagate the plant cuttings (leaves of the plant) you just have to place the cuttings on the surface of the substrate until it begins to take root.

After the plant is of a good size you can transplant it to the place where you want the plant to grow.

Water the cuttings with an atomizer (you can do it daily), taking care that no puddles of water are formed in the substrate, and as the plant grows you must reduce the days of irrigation and wait until the substrate is dry before water it again.

Precautions

It is normal to confuse the kalanchoe x houghtonii with another type of Kalanchoe, since it is a hybrid of the daigremontian Kalanchoe with the Kalanchoe delagoensis.

But something very important and where you cannot be confused is that some types of Kalanchoe are for medicinal use, especially in Latin America, Asia and Africa are used to treating diseases and ailments, such as lessons, but the kalanchoe x houghtonii is not for medicinal use, since both its leaves and its stems are toxic and are not for human consumption.

For this reason, you have to be careful with the kalanchoe x houghtonii, and you should not for any reason consume this type of Kalanchoe.


Highlights

Kalanchoe x houghtonii: A bryophyllum type Kalanchoe that's a hybrid of K. daigremontiana x K. delagoensis. This variety has opposite, narrow leaves that reach 3.0" to 6.0" long with margins that bear young plantlets. It is aggressively prolific and will choke out other plants around it.

Please Note: All parts of this plant are poisonous if ingested.

Soft succulents will not survive a hard frost, but if there is a risk of freezing temperatures they can be brought indoors to grow on a sunny window sill or under a grow light. They need great drainage and infrequent water to prevent rot. Pick containers with drainage holes and use well-draining cactus and succulent soil with 50% to 70% mineral grit such as coarse sand, pumice, or perlite. Water deeply enough for water to run out the drainage hole, then wait for the soil to fully dry before watering again.

This variety is easy to re-root from stem cuttings. Look to our Succulent Cuttings Guide for tips on succulent propagation.


Watch the video: Never Buy Mother Of Thousands, Just Propagate with actual results


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